This week the House convenes for the first time since the fall. Speaker Madigan, who controls the session calendar, cancelled session last week. Despite the overwhelming amount of work to do, the House will only meet 14 times between now and April. On Wednesday the Governor will give his State of the State address to a joint session of the House and Senate. 

“Right to Sunscreen”
I’ve recently filed several bills, including one that will make sunscreen more widely available to students in Illinois. Sunscreen is considered an over the counter drug by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and many school policies require a doctor’s note for students to be given such medications. Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the US and we are needlessly putting our children in danger with these kinds of policies. My bill requires a public school to permit a student, without the authorization of the student's parent or legal guardian or a physician, to possess or self-apply sunscreen.

If you would like to propose a bill or have any legislative ideas, reach out to my office via my email at repmcdermed@ilhousegop.org or through my website.  
Springfield, IL… State Representative Margo McDermed (R-Mokena) has introduced a bill to make sunscreen more widely available to students in Illinois. Sunscreen is considered an over the counter drug by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and many school policies require physician authorization for students to be given such medications.

“It is pretty straightforward; if a student wants to put on sunscreen, they should be able to,” Rep. McDermed said. “Unfortunately, red tape at schools can prevent this. Given the dangers of skin cancer, it is common sense to loosen these restrictions.”

Image result for generic sunscreen photoAccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. Evidence shows that sunburns during childhood or adolescence can nearly double a person’s chance of developing melanoma. The CDC advises applying sunscreen every time a child goes outside.

“Students shouldn’t need a doctor’s note to put on sunscreen. Our children spend most of their time at school and these kinds of policies put them unnecessarily at risk of dangerous sun exposure,” Rep. McDermed continued.

House Bill 4216 requires a public school to permit a student, without the authorization of the student's parent or legal guardian or a physician, to possess or self-apply sunscreen. The bill has been introduced and is awaiting assignment to a committee. 

I hope everyone had a happy holiday season and is enjoying the new year thus far. I had a wonderful time seeing my family together again and hope you found a similar joy.